Performing live time-traversal queries on RDF datasets

Guest post by Arcangelo Massari, University of Bologna

In this post, Arcangelo Massari, who recently graduated in Digital Humanities and Digital Knowledge under Professor Silvio Peroni at the University of Bologna, shares the results of his master thesis.

A particular problem in information retrieval is that of obtaining data from an evolving dataset, independent of the time at which that item of data was added, changed or removed. To permit such time-independent queries to be performed over evolving RDF datasets, I have developed two new pieces of open source software, time-agnostic-library [1] and time-agnostic-browser [2], that are now available from the OpenCitations GitHub repository.

The time-agnostic-library is a Python library to perform live time-traversal queries on RDF datasets. Time-traversal means being agnostic about time: a SPARQL query that is not run on the current state of the collection but over its entire history or over a specified timespan of that history [3]. This tool allows materializations – obtaining all versions of an entity over time, or its status at a given time. Furthermore, SPARQL queries can be performed to get the delta between two or more versions of one or more resources. Thereby, the time-agnostic-library realizes all the retrieval functionalities described in the taxonomy by Fernández et al. [3].

To complement this query software, the time-agnostic-browser is a web application built on top of the time-agnostic-library to achieve the same results via a graphical user interface.

The primary purpose of these developments is to offer a system for browsing the provenance [4] of RDF statements across time: who produced them, when, where the information was taken from, and what changes were made compared to the previous state of the resource. Knowledge of such information is essential because data changes over time, either because of the natural evolution of concepts or due to the correction of mistakes. Indeed, the latest version of knowledge may not be the most accurate. Such phenomena are particularly tangible in the Web of Data, as highlighted in a study by the Dynamic Linked Data Observatory, which noted the modification of about 38% of the nearly 90,000 RDF documents monitored for 29 weeks, and the permanent disappearance of 5% of them [5] (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Donut chart showing the results of the study conducted by the Dynamic Linked Data Observatory on the evolution of RDF documents [5].

Additionally, the truthfulness of data cannot be assessed without provenance records and a system to query them. In fact, the truth value of an assertion on the Web is never absolute, as demonstrated by Wikipedia, which in its official policy on the subject states: “The threshold for inclusion in Wikipedia is verifiability, not truth.” [6]. The Semantic Web does not alter that condition, and trustworthiness has to be evaluated by each application by probing the context of the statements [7]. It is a challenging task and thus, in the Semantic Web Stack, trust is the highest and most complex level to satisfy, subsuming all the previous ones (Figure 2).

Figure 2.The Semantic Web layers [7]. Trust is the uppermost level of the stack, subsuming all the others.

Notwithstanding these premises, at present the most extensive RDF datasets – DBPedia [8], Wikidata [9], Yago [10], and the Dynamic Linked Data Observatory [11] – do not use RDF to track changes and record the provenance of such changes. Instead, they all adopt backup-based archiving policies. Some of them, such as Yago 4, record provenance but not changes. As far as citation databases are concerned, OpenCitations is the only infrastructure to implement change-tracking mechanisms and to record full RDF provenance records for each data entity. Among the leading players in this field, neither Web of Science nor Scopus have adopted similar solutions.

In accordance with the OpenCitations Data Model (OCDM) [12], a provenance snapshot is generated by OpenCitations every time a bibliographical entity is created or modified. Each snapshot (prov:Entity) records the responsible agent (prov:wasAttributedTo), the generation time (prov:generatedAtTime), the invalidation time (prov:invalidatedAtTime), the primary source (prov:hadPrimarySource), and a link to the previous snapshot (prov:wasDerivedFrom), using terms from the Provenance Ontology. In addition, OCDM introduced a system to simplify restoring an entity’s status at a given time, by saving the delta between two versions as a SPARQL update query (prov:hasUpdateQuery) [13] (Figure 3). This approach enables one to restore an entity to a specific timepoint (snapshot) in a straightforward way by applying the inverse operations, i.e., deletions instead of additions, etc.

Figure 3. Provenance in the OpenCitations Data Model.

This solution is concretely used in all the datasets related to the OpenCitations infrastructure, such as COCI, an open index containing almost 1.2 billion DOI-to-DOI citation links derived from the open reference data available in Crossref [14]. It is important to note that this OpenCitations provenance model is generic and reusable in any other context. Since the time-agnostic-library leverages OCDM, it too is generic and can be used for any RDF dataset that tracks changes and provenance as OpenCitations does.

The time-agnostic-library is released under the ISC license and is downloadable through pip [1]. Test-driven development was adopted as a software development process during its creation [15]. It makes three main classes available to the user: AgnosticEntity, VersionQuery, and DeltaQuery, for materializations, version queries, and delta queries, respectively (Listing 1).

Listing 1. Code template to achieve materializations, time-traversal queries, and delta queries.

All three operations can be performed over the entire available history of the dataset, or by specifying a time interval via a tuple in the form (START, END).

The time-agnostic-browser [2] is also released under the ISC license and can be run as a Flask application. It is organized into two macro-sections: “Explore” and “Query”. In the former, a text input accepts a URI. By submitting it, the entire history of the corresponding resource is displayed. In the latter, a text area receives a SPARQL query, which is resolved on all dataset states. Its main added value is hiding the triples and the complexity of the underlying RDF model: predicate URIs, as well as subjects and objects, appear in a human-readable format. Moreover, all the entities are displayed as links, providing shortcuts to reconstruct the history of the related resources (Figure 4).

Figure 4. Graphical user interface of an entity history reconstruction through the time-agnostic-browser.

The efficiency of time-agnostic-library was measured with two types of benchmarks [16], one on execution times and the other on the amount of computer memory (RAM) required by ten different use cases, each repeated ten times to produce significant results and avoid outliers. In light of these benchmarks, time-agnostic-library has proven effective for any materialization. Regarding structured queries, they are swift if all subjects are known or deductible. On the other hand, the presence of unknown subjects in the user’s SPARQL query involves the identification of all present and past entities that satisfy that pattern, and so requires a more significant amount of time and resources. Specifically, all materializations and the cross-version structured query with known subjects required about half a second and about 50 MB of RAM; conversely, with unknown subjects, 581 seconds and 519 MB of RAM are required. It can be concluded that the proposed software can be used effectively in all cases where the subject is known, that is, for any materialization or formulated SPARQL queries without isolated triple patterns containing unknown subjects.

Other software solutions for such problems have been proposed. Table 1 shows the list of available software to perform materializations and time-traversal queries on RDF datasets. As can be observed, time-agnostic-library is the only one to support all retrieval functionalities without requiring pre-indexing processes. This feature makes it particularly suitable for use in scenarios with large amounts of data that often change over time. Moreover, compared to the approach of Im, Lee and Kim [17] and OSTRICH [18], the OpenCitations Data Model only requires storing the current state of the dataset, rather than the original one, allowing one to query the latest version, without additional computational effort to first re-create the original version.

SoftwareVersion materializationDelta materializationSingle-version structured queryCross-version structured querySingle-delta structured queryCross-delta structured queryLive
PromptDiff [19]+++
SemVersion [20]+++
Im, Lee, & Kim, 2012 [17]+++++
R&Wbase [21]++++
x-RDF-3X [22]+++
v-RDFCSA [23]++++++
OSTRICH [18]+++
Tanon & Suchanek, 2019 [24]++++++
time-agnostic-library[1]+++++++
Table 1. Comparative between time-agnostic-library and preexisting software to achieve materializations and time traversal queries on RDF datasets. (Scroll right to see Columns 6-8).

The OpenCitations Data Model and the time-agnostic-library software are the pre-requisites that will allow OpenCitations to involve third parties, for example members of staff in academic libraries, in the submission, curation and updating of OpenCitations bibliographic and citation data. At this stage, all entities in COCI have a single snapshot — the one made at the time of creation. However, since these entities may become modified, corrected or enriched over time, it is imperative to have appropriate software tools available for use by curators. With the time-agnostic-library software and its associated time-agnostic-browser, it will be possible for a curator to explore the entire history of the changes within an RDF dataset, to know when they were made, based on which source, and by which responsible agent, thus ensuring the reliability and verifiability of data, and facilitating any necessary further changes.

References

[1] A. Massari, time-agnostic-library. 2021. Available: https://archive.softwareheritage.org/swh:1:snp:d7fd1754377f45d16afb61efc770815b5a3c8f83

[2] A. Massari, time-agnostic-browser. 2021. Available: https://archive.softwareheritage.org/swh:1:dir:337f641375cca034eda39c2380b4a7878382fc4c

[3] J. D. Fernández, A. Polleres, and J. Umbrich, ‘Towards Efficient Archiving of Dynamic Linked’, in DIACRON@ESWC, Portorož, Slovenia: Computer Science, 2015, pp. 34–49.

[4] December, ‘Provenance XG Final Report’. 2010. Available: http://www.w3.org/2005/Incubator/prov/XGR-prov-20101214/

[5] T. Käfer, A. Abdelrahman, J. Umbrich, P. O’Byrne, and A. Hogan, ‘Observing Linked Data Dynamics’, in The Semantic Web: Semantics and Big Data, vol. 7882, P. Cimiano, O. Corcho, V. Presutti, L. Hollink, and S. Rudolph, Eds. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013, pp. 213–227. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-38288-8_15

[6] S. L. Garfinkel, ‘Wikipedia and the Meaning of Truth’, MIT Technology Review, 2008, [Online]. Available: https://stephencodrington.com/Blogs/Hong_Kong_Blog/Entries/2009/4/11_What_is_Truth_files/Wikipedia%20and%20the%20Meaning%20of%20Truth.pdf

[7] M.-R. Koivunen and E. Miller, ‘Semantic Web Activity’, W3C, Nov. 02, 2001. https://www.w3.org/2001/12/semweb-fin/w3csw

[8] F. Orlandi and A. Passant, ‘Modelling provenance of DBpedia resources using Wikipedia contributions’, Journal of Web Semantics, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 149–164, Jul. 2011, doi: 10.1016/j.websem.2011.03.002.

[9] P. Dooley and B. Božić, ‘Towards Linked Data for Wikidata Revisions and Twitter Trending Hashtags’, in Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Information Integration and Web-based Applications & Services, Munich Germany, Dec. 2019, pp. 166–175. doi: 10.1145/3366030.3366048.

[10] Yago Project, ‘Download data, code, and logo of Yago projects’, Yago, 2021. https://yago-knowledge.org/downloads (accessed Sep. 24, 2021).

[11] J. Umbrich, M. Hausenblas, A. Hogan, A. Polleres, and S. Decker, ‘Towards Dataset Dynamics: Change Frequency of Linked Open Data Sources’, in Proceedings of the WWW2010 Workshop on Linked Data on the Web, Raleigh, USA, 2010. Available: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-628/ldow2010_paper12.pdf

[12] M. Daquino, S. Peroni, and D. Shotton, ‘The OpenCitations Data Model’, p. 836876 Bytes, 2020, doi: 10.6084/M9.FIGSHARE.3443876.V7.

[13] S. Peroni, D. Shotton, and F. Vitali, ‘A Document-inspired Way for Tracking Changes of RDF Data’, in Detection, Representation and Management of Concept Drift in Linked Open Data, Bologna, 2016, pp. 26–33. Available: http://ceur-ws.org/Vol-1799/Drift-a-LOD2016_paper_4.pdf

[14] I. Heibi, S. Peroni, and D. Shotton, ‘Software review: COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations’, Scientometrics, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 1213–1228, Nov. 2019, doi: 10.1007/s11192-019-03217-6.

[15] K. Beck, Test-driven development: by example. Boston: Addison-Wesley, 2003.

[16] A. Massari, ‘time-agnostic-library: benchmark results on execution times and RAM’. Zenodo, Oct. 05, 2021. doi: 10.5281/ZENODO.5549648.

[17] D.-H. Im, S.-W. Lee, and H.-J. Kim, ‘A Version Management Framework for RDF Triple Stores’, Int. J. Softw. Eng. Knowl. Eng., vol. 22, pp. 85–106, 2012.

[18] R. Taelman, M. V. Sande, and R. Verborgh, ‘OSTRICH: Versioned Random-Access Triple Store’, in Companion Proceedings of the Web Conference 2018, 2018, pp. 127–130. Available: https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/157574975.pdf

[19] N. F. Noy and M. A. Musen, ‘Promptdiff: A Fixed-Point Algorithm for Comparing Ontology Versions’, in Proc. of IAAI, 2002, pp. 744–750.

[20] M. Völkel, W. Winkler, Y. Sure, S. Kruk, and M. Synak, ‘SemVersion: A Versioning System for RDF and Ontologies’, 2005.

[21] M. V. Sande, P. Colpaert, R. Verborgh, S. Coppens, E. Mannens, and R. V. Walle, ‘R&Wbase: Git for triples’, 2013.

[22] T. Neumann and G. Weikum, ‘x-RDF-3X: Fast Querying, High Update Rates, and Consistency for RDF Databases’, Proceedings of the VLDB Endowment, vol. 3, pp. 256–263, 2010.

[23] A. Cerdeira-Pena, A. Farina, J. D. Fernandez, and M. A. Martinez-Prieto, ‘Self-Indexing RDF Archives’, in 2016 Data Compression Conference (DCC), Snowbird, UT, USA, Mar. 2016, pp. 526–535. doi: 10.1109/DCC.2016.40.

[24] T. Pellissier Tanon and F. Suchanek, ‘Querying the Edit History of Wikidata’, in The Semantic Web: ESWC 2019 Satellite Events, vol. 11762, P. Hitzler, S. Kirrane, O. Hartig, V. de Boer, M.-E. Vidal, M. Maleshkova, S. Schlobach, K. Hammar, N. Lasierra, S. Stadtmüller, K. Hose, and R. Verborgh, Eds. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2019, pp. 161–166. doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-32327-1_32.

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Performing live time-traversal queries on RDF datasets," in OpenCitations blog, 29/11/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1427.

Open Access Tage 2021: valuable insights from the libraries in the German-speaking region 

On September 27, OpenCitations’ director Silvio Peroni, together with Niels Stern (DOAB/OAPEN) and James MacGregor (PKP), held the online workshop “How Open Infrastructure Benefits Libraries” during the Open Access Tage 2021. Open-Access-Tage (Open Access Days) are the annual central platform for the steadily growing Open Access and Open Science community from Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and are aimed at all those involved with the possibilities, conditions and perspectives of scientific publishing.  

The workshop gathered three of the SCOSS-supported infrastructures to discuss how Open Infrastructures (OIs) could encourage the engagement of university libraries, and how they could be beneficial game-changing alternative to commercial infrastructures. This theme, which was also been presented during the last LIBER conference, was here discussed under a new perspective, by involving the specific case of the libraries from the German-speaking region. Their point of view particularly emerged during the second part of the workshop, during which the participants were divided into two breakout rooms to discuss two questions each. These are the answers and comments that emerged from the discussions.  

1. What would prevent or encourage libraries in the German-speaking region to support open infrastructures? 

The three main concepts held to be crucial in this field were transparency, promotion and governance.  

Transparency: German libraries and public institutions often deal with strict funding limitations relating to donations. It is therefore crucial for OIs (a) to present in a clear way how libraries can get involved and the money needed, (b) to communicate what they do and how they can add value to libraries compared to other services, and (c) to clarify the direct return and benefits on investments. These points would make it easier to recommend OIs internally, especially when people from subject-specific institutions are interested in subject-independent OIs. Point (b) leads to the Promotion issue: Open Infrastructures should promote themselves non only on a global level, by communicating their impact in the open research movement as against non-transparent propitiatory services, but also at a local level, by providing information about the usage (and the value) of their services at an institutional and/or national level. This case-by-case narration (with attention to the specific benefits) would make it easier for the institutions to evaluate the sustainability of the investment. An incentive to donate is being actively involved in the community governance, i.e.through a board membership.  

Nevertheless, is also necessary for libraries to “take courage” when investing in such OIs, and, when possible, to overcome administrative boundaries by forming consortia. Finally, of particular note was a desire to see locally-managed sub-communities that could speak specifically to the German (or whichever) language environment, much as ORCID arranges itself.  

2. Community Governance. What kind of involvement do you want to see, how do you want to be involved? 

Some common problems which prevent the institutions from being involved are (a) a general concern about the fact that negotiations with publishers are typically the main focus of OA discussions – leaving little time to focus on OIs and other open initiatives, and (b) a lack of time, or of guidelines, for evaluating the different infrastructures to invest in. This is why SCOSS was appreciated as an intermediary in the decision process, because of its own rigorous evaluation and selection mechanismThe community-funding approach proposed by SCOSS thus seems to be the preferred way by which to support OIs.  

Regarding community governance, one idea could be to involve interested scholars in the governance of the open infrastructures (with the library acting as an interface between the open infrastructure and the scholars) rather than only involving library staff – although this idea was argued against in the second group, as researchers are often percieved as too busy to be functional in operational infrastructure groups. What also emerged from this second question is an interest in community involvement on different levels, for example as a community of practices or through discussion boards, mailing lists, periodic meet-ups, workshops, newsletters, etc. The community could also be articulated into local sub-communities, as in the successful case of ORCID and ORCID_DE.  

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Open Access Tage 2021: valuable insights from the libraries in the German-speaking region ," in OpenCitations blog, 07/10/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1394.

Save the dates: OpenCitations October events 

With the numerous September events in which the OpenCitations’ directors have recently been involved behind us, it is now time to announce the participation of our director Silvio Peroni in two October events. 

On Wednesday 6th, Silvio will take part in the Beilstein OpenScience Symposium 2021 (October 5-7), giving a short presentation “Open Citations, an Open Infrastructure to Provide Access to Global Scholarly Bibliographic and Citation Data” during the Poster Flash Talk Presentation (17:10-18:00 CEST). The Beilstein OpenScience Symposium is an annual event that gathers leaders in the FAIR and Open Data movement, covering a wide range of research fields, including biomedical research, physics and social science, and exploring how open data practices are transforming sectors outside academia. The 2021 online edition will present a series of talks addressing the many ways that data transparency contributes to the research progress. Among them, the poster presentations involve short oral presentations on Wednesday, 6th October, to accompany the posters that will be displayed throughout the entire symposium. Poster abstracts are available in the Abstract Book that can be downloaded on Beilstein Symposium’s website: https://www.beilstein-institut.de/en/symposia/open-science/program/ .

You can register for the event here: https://www.beilstein-institut.de/en/symposia/open-science/registration/

The poster and slides from the presentation are available on Zenodo:

Peroni, S. (2021, October 6). Open Citations, an Open Infrastructure to Provide Access to Global Scholarly Bibliographic and Citation Data—Poster Flash Talk Session slides. Beilstein Open Science Symposium 2021, Virtual Event. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5553025

Peroni, S., Shotton, D. W., & Di Giambattista, C. (2021). Open Citations, an Open Infrastructure to Provide Access to Global Scholarly Bibliographic and Citation Data. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5553040

The second event is the annual European Computer Science Summit (ECSS), organized by Informatics Europe and involving academics, industry leaders, decision makers and others interested in Informatics/Computer Science research and education in Europe. ECSS 2021, “Informatics for a Sustainable Future” (Oct. 25-27), will be held as a hybrid event, involving both online as well as on-site sessions held in Madrid, at the Facultad de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte (INEF), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid located at Calle de Martín Fierro, 7

During the last day of the meeting (Oct. 27), Silvio Peroni will be speaking at the “National Informatics Associations Workshop”, an annual workshop organised by Informatics Europe in collaboration with the National Informatics Associations in Europe. This year the workshop will address the themes Informatics in Interdisciplinary Curricula and Research Evaluation in Informatics, thus focusing on an important question: how to recognise, assess and credit research contributions specific to Informatics, such as conference publications and software artefacts. Elaborating on this, Silvio’s talk (to be delivered in person, rather than online!) is entitled “Open citations in Informatics” (9:00 CEST).  

For further information and registrations: https://www.informatics-europe.org/ecss/registration/how-to-register.html

We thank Beilstein Institute and Informatics Europe for involving OpenCitations in these international events, which provide opportunities to promote the OpenCitations infrastructure and services in stimulating environments.

We hope to see you there

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Save the dates: OpenCitations October events ," in OpenCitations blog, 05/10/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1383.

Save the dates: OpenCitations’ September events 

We are happy to announce OpenCitations’ participation in a number of online conferences and events during the next few weeks. Our directors Silvio Peroni and David Shotton will be speaking at the Open Science Fair 2021, the OASPA Conference 2021 and Open Access Tage.  

Open Science Fair 2021 (20-23 September) is an event organized by OpenAIRE, in collaboration with some key international initiatives in the area of Open Science: COAR, EIFL, Force11, LA Referencia, LIBER, OPERAS, Sparc, Sparc Europe. Like a real fair, the visitors can explore virtual pavilions, participating in various Keynote Talks, Parallel Sessions and Workshops dedicated to Open Science. Silvio Peroni will give two talks on Tuesday 21:  

  • In the Lightning Talk, “ScholeXplorer and OpenCitations as the new frontier of open citation indexing” (11:30 CEST), coauthored with Paolo Manghi (OpenAire), Alessia Bardi (CNR-ISTI) and Sandro La Bruzzo (CNR-ISTI), Silvio will present ScholeXplorer and OpenCitations, two of the services included in the MONITOR portfolio of the OpenAIRE-Nexus project. More information and registrations at: https://www.opensciencefair.eu/2021/lightning-talks/scholexplorer-and-opencitations-as-the-new-frontier-of-open-citation-indexing  
  • The Workshop “The perils of being invisible. Collective funding models for Open Science infrastructure” (16:30-18:00 CEST) “will help identify the main challenges of collective funding models for Open Science Infrastructure, as well as explore the path forward to make them more efficient”. Silvio Peroni, Niels Stern (DOAB/OAPEN) James MacGregor (PKP), Agata Morka (SPARC Europe/SCOSS), Jon Treadway (the Great North Wood Consulting), Jean-Francois Lutz (University of Lorraine) and Vanessa Proudman (SPARC Europe) will reflect on the evanescence of Open Science Infrastructure (OSI) in library budget considerations. The speakers will also promote interaction with other workshop participants in order to create a collective dialogue. You can register for the event here: https://www.opensciencefair.eu/2021/workshops/the-perils-of-being-invisible  

The OASPA Conference 2021 (21-23 September), entitled “Designing 21st Century Knowledge Sharing Systems”, will be dedicated to “many timely and fundamental topics relating to open scholarly communication”, including  “the ongoing impact of the pandemic”.  David Shotton will take part in the Poster Lightning Talks Session 3 (Thursday 23, 1-2 pm BST), with the title “OpenCitations – what does the future hold?”, a reflection on OpenCitations’ values, data, services, achievements so far, and plans for the future. For further information and registration: https://oaspa.org/conference/  

Silvio Peroni, together with James MacGregor (Public Knowledge Project) and Niels Stern (OAPEN) will hold the Workshop “How Open Infrastructure Benefits Libraries?” (September 27, 11:30-13 CEST) as part of the Open Access Tage 2021 (27-29 September), an annual event dedicated to Open Access initiatives and community. During the workshop, the speakers will investigate the social and economic value of open infrastructures for libraries. For more information and to register for the event: https://oat21.sched.com/event/kdFg/workshop-2-how-open-infrastructure-benefits-libraries  

We thank the organizers of these prestigious international events for having invited OpenCitations to participate. The Open Science resounds and grows through such community-centered initiatives.  

If you wish to learn more about Open Science, ongoing Open Access initiatives, and OpenCitations’ commitment to and activities within these areas, don’t miss the opportunity to participate in these on-line conferences … see you there! 

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Save the dates: OpenCitations’ September events ," in OpenCitations blog, 15/09/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1341.

California Digital Library invests in OpenCitations

OpenCitations is excited to announce that the California Digital Library (CDL) has joined our growing list of contributors.

CDL’s commitment to sustainable open scholarship has great value for the global scholarly community.  Through its investments and partnerships, CDL aims to create an international academic and librarian dialogue, trusting in the idea that “the university, its scholars and its libraries thrive when we transcend organizational boundaries and commit ourselves to shared investments”.

CDL’s contribution will generously support OpenCitations throughout 2021-2023. CDL funding in the fiscal year 2020-2021 also includes two other SCOSS-endorsed infrastructures, OAPEN and DOAB, the non-profit organization Open Access Switchboard, and the services PsyArXiv and SCOAP3 Books. As can be read in the recent post by Ellen Finnie, this investment reflects CDL’s “commitment to ’invest in open’ by allocating a portion of our collections funding to the development of open content and infrastructure in support of UC scholarship and teaching”.

OpenCitations team is grateful to be included in CDL’s ongoing investment in open infrastructure.  Thank you!

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "California Digital Library invests in OpenCitations," in OpenCitations blog, 10/09/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1336.

92 million new citations added to COCI

It’s been a month since the announcement of 1.09 Billion Citations available in the July 2021 release of COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations.  

We’re now proud to announce the September 2021 release of COCI, which is based on open references to works with DOIs within the Crossref dump dated August 2021. This new release extends COCI with more than 92 Million additional citations, giving a total number of more than 1.18 Billion DOI-to-DOI citation links.

This latest release includes citations from the most recent articles published by the American Chemical Society, whose bibliographic references were opened in February 2021. The ACS back number citations will be available in the next COCI release, when a new processing of all the Crossref data will be completed.

You can find more information about COCI in our open-access article 

Ivan Heibi, Silvio Peroni & David Shotton (2019). Software review: COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations. Scientometrics, 121 (2): 1213-1228. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-019-03217-6  

Finally, just a reminder that the bibliographic and citation data in COCI: 

  • can be queried using the OpenCitations Indexes SPARQL endpoint; 
  • can be retrieved by using the COCI REST API
  • can be searched by using the OpenCitations Indexes Search Interface; 
  • are also available as dumps on Figshare in CSV, N-Triples, and Scholix; and 
  • can be freely re-used for any purpose. 
Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "92 million new citations added to COCI," in OpenCitations blog, 09/09/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1322.

OpenCitations’ compliance with the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure

What should an open scholarly infrastructure look like? 

An answer to this tough question can be found in the original February 2015 blog post by Geoffrey Bilder, Jennifer Lin and Cameron Neylon

Bilder G., Lin J., Neylon C. (2015) Principles for Open Scholarly Infrastructure , http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1314859

and in the summary of the principles to be found as:  

Bilder G, Lin J, Neylon C (2020), The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructurehttps://doi.org/10.24343/C34W2H : 

Infrastructure at its best is invisible. We tend to only notice it when it fails.  If successful, it is stable and sustainable. Above all, it is trusted and relied on by the broad community it serves. Trust must run strongly across each of the following areas: running the infrastructure (governance), funding it (sustainability), and preserving community ownership of it (insurance)”. 

These areas are fully define the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI), which provide a set of guidelines by which open scholarly infrastructure organizations and initiatives that support the research community can be run and sustained.  

As far as we are aware, Crossref was the first infrastructure to publish its compliance with POSI, detailed in Geoffrey Bilder’s December 2020 blog post

Crossref’s Board votes to adopt the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure.

OpenCitations too espouses POSI and, in January 2021, we monitored the extent of our own compliance with POSI, the results of which are shown in the following diagram. 

Governance 

 Coverage across the research enterprise We gather citations from global scholarship 
 Stakeholder governed Advisory board 
currently lacks
executive power and is not elected 
 Non-discriminatory membership Membership open to all those espousing 
open science 
● Transparent operations Everything is open 
 Cannot lobby OpenCitations lobbies to achieve open 
scholarly citations 
and bibliographic 
metadata; 
it does not engage in political or financial 
lobbying 
 Living will Since all our data open, others can 
recreate our service 
 Formal incentives to fulfill mission & wind-down No formal plan for wind-down 
has yet been drawn up 

Sustainability 

 Time-limited funds used only for time-limited activities Grant income should 
be used solely for grantprojects 
 Goal to generate surplus Goal not yet realized – 
income so far too limited 
 Goal to create contingency fund to support operations for 12 months Goal not yet realized – 
income so far too limited 
 Mission-consistent revenue generation Membership fees and 
solicited donations 
 Revenue based on services, not data All data and services freely given to community, and thus do not 
generate income 

Insurance 

 Open source All software under open source licenses 
 Open data All data available 
under CC0 waiver 
 Available data All data available via REST APIs, SPARQL endpoints, query interfaces and data dumps 
 Patent non-assertion We will not 
patent anything: 
OpenCitations’ 
infrastructure 
is free to replicate 

 
We at OpenCitations are proud of the results reached in the Insurance area, but realise that we still have some was to go in the other areas. Although the general situation is already satisfying, we are working to strengthen our weak points. 

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "OpenCitations’ compliance with the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure," in OpenCitations blog, 09/08/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1260.

Swiss Institutions pledge 89,250 Euros to OpenCitations

We want to express our gratitude to the 18 institutional members and customers of the Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries which have now pledged 89,250 euros to support OpenCitations over the next three years. This generous donation is part of a total funding of 320,250 euros destined for the three services currently being promoted by SCOSSDOAB and OAPEN, PKP, and OpenCitations.  

The Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries involves all cantonal universities, the ETH Domain, the Swiss National Library and other institutions from the fields of education and research as well as from the public sector, with the core task of licensing of e-resources (electronic journals, databases, eBooks) for its members and customers.  

As can be read in this post, Susanne Aerni, Head of Consortial Services commented on the pledge: “This pledge exemplifies the broad Swiss commitment to vital infrastructure for Open Access and Open Science. All Swiss Universities, all institutions of the ETH-domain, some Universities of Applied Science, CERN, and the Swiss National Science Foundation support these three vital services through the Consortium of Swiss Academic Libraries.” 

Thank you, Switzerland, for your support to OpenCitations! 

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Swiss Institutions pledge 89,250 Euros to OpenCitations," in OpenCitations blog, 06/08/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1257.

Crossing a significant threshold: more than one billion citations now available in COCI!

“The competitive benefits of closing access to citation data diminish with each new citation released to the public domain, but the benefits of open data remain. Going forward, citation data is almost completely public domain”.

With these words, from the article “A tipping point for open citations data” (July 15, 2021), Ian Hutchins celebrated the threshold crossing of one billion citations on public-domain databases in February 2021.

Now, a new significant milestone has been reached. We are enthusiastic to announce that COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations has just been extended with 334 million additional citations. Its most recent release, the COCI July 2021 release, now contains a total of 1.09 billion DOI-to-DOI citation links derived from open references within Crossref,which includes the references of articles deposited or opened in Crossref between November 2020 and January 2021.

These numbers make us proud, and confirm the essential value of the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC). Since 2018, the mission of I4OC has been to persuade publishers to provide open citation data by means of the Crossref platform. The I4OC untiring commitment has led the major academic publishers to a progressive change of heart regarding open citations, and the scholarly community to a deeper interest in this openness.

These factors contributed to the creation of COCI in 2018, the first open citation index created by OpenCitations, in which we applied the concept of citations as first-class data entities (Heibi I., Peroni S., Shotton D., 2019). Over the last three years, COCI has been extended in a series of releases, by harvesting citations mostly from Crossref data dumps, starting from an initial coverage of 300 million citations (First release).

A crucial event that preceded (and delayed!) this latest COCI release was Elsevier’s endorsement in the DORA Declaration on Research Assessment in December 2020, thereby making “reference lists for all articles published in Elsevier journals openly available via Crossref so they can be available for reuse. This means other important initiatives like I4OC can draw on this metadata”. As described in our previous post, Elsevier’s welcome commitment led to the opening of many previously closed references from its numerous academic journals submitted to Crossref. Now, after an extended period of data ingestion and processing, all these newly opened Elsevier references are available at OpenCitations within COCI.

Elsevier’s involvement has both an effective and a symbolical value. Even if publishing more than one billion citations is a thrilling achievement, and – as Hutchins wrote – we are now at a tipping point with regard to open citations data, this milestone is not the last stop. Together with the other organizations and projects that participate in the Initiative for Open Citations, we will keep claiming the urgency for the remaining academic publishers to join our cause, and sharing our values with the whole academic community to make all existing citations data freely open and accessible. Recalling what Dario Taraborelli wrote in the conclusion of his article “The citation graph is one of humankind’s most important intellectual achievements“, “the world is waiting for the citation graph to become a public good”.

Cite this article as: Chiara Di Giambattista, "Crossing a significant threshold: more than one billion citations now available in COCI!," in OpenCitations blog, 04/08/2021, https://opencitations.hypotheses.org/1253.
Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search